Preheating aircraft engines is extremely important. Giving a cold start to the engine without preheating causes much more wear and tear than 1000 hours of runtime will. Or worse, it could lead to engine failure after take-off. While the term preheating might sound like it is just about increasing an engine’s oil temperature, it is more than that. It involves heating the entire engine to bring all working components up to an optimal and safe temperature range.


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 When a flight ends, a commercial aircraft will need to rapidly be cleaned, inspected, and prepared for the next set of passengers in a process known as a turnaround. To ensure smooth flights with no delays, the aircraft turnaround process must be minimal while ensuring all regulations and procedures are met. In this blog, we will discuss the efficiency of aircraft turnaround operations and how such processes can be safely improved.


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Combined with the stress of high-speed rotating engine components, engines face fatigue over time that can result in malfunction or failure. To protect the service life of aircraft engines, routine maintenance should be carried out frequently.


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The orientation of the axis is not affected by the tilted mounting, enabling the gyroscope to provide critical data about the aircraft. To become more familiar with such an instrument, this blog will cover different types of gyroscopes, their applications, and importance.


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Welding is a fabrication method that is often used to join metals and thermoplastics together, relying on high heat to conjoin parts through fusion. Welding is practiced for the manufacturing of countless assemblies, even finding many uses in the realm of aviation for aircraft part construction. Despite this, there are certain areas of an aircraft in which welding cannot be used, necessitating a reliance on fasteners and other solutions for securing assemblies. In this blog, we will discuss the most common aircraft parts and sections that cannot be welded, allowing you to better be aware of the limitations of such practices in the aerospace industry.


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Airplanes are some of the most meticulously designed vehicles in engineering. While it is easy to appreciate the apparent flight control surfaces like the wings, elevators, and rudder, hundreds of other equally important components in the plane's interior contribute to safe operation. In this blog, we will be discussing the design and function of an aircraft's various bulkheads.


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In order for a local area network to relay data packets between devices, a component known as a network switch is often used. Unlike a router that may manage data across multiple devices and networks simultaneously, a network switch is specifically intended for directing data towards a single device. In this blog, we will discuss network switches, their common types, and uses, allowing you to better understand typical network configurations and assemblies.


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While a number of networks now rely on Wi-Fi for devices to interface with the Internet, such technology is often unable to match the speed, reliability, and security of Ethernet cables. Ethernet is a set of networking technology standards, permitting communication between computer stations, printers, and other various electronic equipment. Serving as a component that helps establish wired networks, such cables allow the creation of a local area network that may be useful for many reasons.


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While glass cockpits were once an exciting new technology proposing to revolutionize the aircraft flight deck, glass avionics now are a staple that are even retrofitted into older aircraft as an emerging standard. Unlike the more conventional analog cockpit avionics, gauges, and systems that have long served aircraft for many years, advanced cockpit and canopy configurations have introduced computers, keyboards, and digital displays that have radically changed how a pilot may receive and manage flight systems and data. As there are still a number of aircraft that are obtainable with an analog cockpit, understanding the differences between the two can help one make a decision for which they would like to fly with.
 
 The analog cockpit is a design that has long served aviation since its early days, and such configurations consist of a number of indicators, gauges, instruments, and electromechanical controls. With the complexity of some systems, many flights once required an engineer and two pilots to operate all controls. Analog systems also often require much of the space of the cockpit and canopy, competing over each other for the pilot’s attention as they manage the aircraft throughout a flight. While very reliable in some regards due to operations being based on mechanical systems, gyroscopes, aneroids, and other components, the complexity could be considered a drawback.
 
After decades of research and development, the frame assembly glass cockpit and its electronic flight instrument systems began to be implemented within commercial aircraft during the late 1990s and general aviation aircraft in the 2000s. Unlike the conventional cockpit avionics and systems of analogue setups, glass cockpits introduced the digital primary flight display which consolidated the main set of flight instruments, a multifunction display featuring moving maps and weather, and other more advanced parts. With the introduction of such systems, more flexibility and ease of use was achieved for the benefit of flight.
 
 As compared to analog cockpit assemblies, the glass cockpit provides most important information on a single screen, allowing for pilots to reduce the amount of scanning required for reading measurements. Nevertheless, training is required for understanding the controls and functionality of systems, and there is a lack of standardization across manufacturer equipment. As a result, pilots must learn each system if multiple aircraft are flown. The fewer amount of mechanical parts in a glass cockpit also means that there is less need for regular maintenance and overhaul, making such systems very reliable. Glass cockpit systems do require backup instruments for redundancy, however, and are dependent on electrical power for operations.
 
Due to the addition of electronic displays, computerized systems, and enhanced controls, glass cockpits permit much more flexibility as displays may be customizable in their configuration. Additionally, engine performance displays can also be integrated for more ease of monitoring systems and conditions. With analogue systems, on the other hand, each instrument is limited to a single function for which it was designed. With customization and consolidation also comes visibility, ensuring that a pilot has little trouble accessing the information they need, avoiding the distance and parallax issues that often occur with round dials.
 
Beyond such examples, there are also differences in the ability to set alerts, utilize newer connectivity features, and much more. While glass cockpits are more advanced and may bring various forms of enhanced capabilities to the aircraft, they tend to be more expensive initially. As a result, the choice between the two will often come down to a pilot’s familiarity with systems or their willingness to learn, their financial abilities, and requirements. When it comes time to begin sourcing the analog or glass cockpit parts and components that you require for your operations, there is no better alternative to Jet Parts 360.
 
Jet Parts 360 is a trusted distributor of aircraft parts and other aerospace components, offering customers competitive quotes for every aviation product for their comparisons. We invite you to peruse our massive part catalogs at your leisure, and our team of industry experts are always on standby 24/7x365 to assist you through the purchasing process as necessary. Give our team members a call or email today and see how we can help you fulfill all your operational requirements quickly and easily.


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While many gas turbines are regularly used as the engine of an aircraft, they can also serve natural-gas-fueled power plants for the means of electrical generation. As a longstanding technology, gas turbines are one of the most widely-used assemblies for power production, and they operate through the properties of internal combustion. While gas turbines are complex machines that can come in various forms, their main sections and general operations tend to remain the same. In this blog, we will discuss the functionality of gas turbines, allowing you to better understand how they may be used for the generation of electricity.
 
 Across gas turbine types, the three primary sections of the assembly are the compressor, the combustion system, and the turbine. The compressor is tasked with drawing air into the engine before increasing its pressure and speed through varying means. Gas turbine engine compressors may be axial, centrifugal, or mixed flow in their design, and each presents its varying advantages. For power generation, however, the axial design is the most widely used variation due to its high flow rate capability and efficiency. Once air has sufficiently been pressurized by the compressor, it is then sent into the combustion chamber at speeds reaching hundreds of miles per hour.
 
The combustion system, or combustion chamber, is the section of the turbine where the ignition of fuel-and-air mixtures takes place. As the high pressure air enters the assembly, it passes through a ring of fuel injectors which spray a consistent stream of fuel so that it may be mixed into the air. With the use of spark plugs or another ignition device, the pressurized fuel-and-air mixture may be ignited at a temperature surpassing 2000 degrees Fahrenheit. As the mixture is ignited, it produces quickly expanding gases with high pressure and heat. This expanding gas forces its way out of the combustion system and is then passed into the turbine assembly.
 
The turbine section consists of aerofoil blades that are organized in an array of stationary and rotating sections that alternate. As the hot and expanding combustion gases pass through the blade gas turbine assembly, they force the blades to begin spinning at high speeds. With the rotational force of the turbine blades, power can be used to drive the compressor for continuing the intake of air as well as spin a generator for electricity generation.
 
When using a gas turbine for power generation, having the highest fuel-to-power efficiency possible is best for operations. One of the biggest factors for fuel-to-power ratios is operating temperatures, and higher temperatures tend to lead to increased efficiency and savings. As there can be various parts that are at risk of damage due to the intense heat of such operations, cooling air may be used from the compressor to increase thermal management for the protection of sensitive components. Another method to increase efficiency is to use a recuperator or heat recovery steam generator in order to take advantage of exhaust for more energy. While a simplistic gas turbine may only be capable of reaching an energy conversion efficiency rate of 20-35%, high-end systems with proper thermal management, recuperators, or other equipment can reach up to 80% efficiency.
 
 Through the various steps of the combustion process, fuel and air may be used to create large amounts of energy that is harnessed by the turbine for the means of electrical generation. When you are in need of reliable gas turbine assembly products such as bolt gas turbine parts, compressor components, spark plugs, and more, look no further than Jet Parts 360. Jet Parts 360 is a trusted distributor of aircraft parts and other aerospace components, and we provide customers the ability to compare quotes for every aviation product we carry through the use of our RFQ service. Initiate the request for quote process today and experience how Jet Parts 360 can serve as your strategic sourcing partner.


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